CGTN's Liu Xin: Hong Kong for me is a unique experience
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By CGTN's Liu Xin
Hong Kong for me is a unique experience.  The last time I got to know this city was almost a decade ago, and my impression had faded pretty much. The big question in my mind when I arrived this time was: Will I enjoy this city? Or will it treat me fairly? 
CGTN Photo

CGTN Photo

Theoretically, I am not a foreigner here, yet, I don’t feel totally at home. Being multilingual, I sometimes encounter more difficulties communicating with the local people than I would during trips abroad. 
Having heard much about the frictions between mainlanders and locals over behavioral differences, I am constantly aware of how I carry myself, in order not to add to their misperceptions… and, of course, not to embarrass myself either.
CGTN Photo

CGTN Photo

Soon after my arrival, I had my first “test”.  It was raining and I was about to leave my hotel. I saw an umbrella right outside the main entrance. I hesitated a bit before taking it, wondering whether I could use it or not; but the concierge came out, and loudly and bluntly told me I could not use this one. If I needed one, I had to go and register at the service desk. He did not address me properly, with no smile, no “please”, no “excuse me”. 
As I was wondering out loud if I was being mistreated because I was a mainlander, two local passersby assured me that the majority of people in Hong Kong were not like that. “Whether coming from Hong Kong or the mainland,” one of them added, "we are all Chinese." They were not fluent in Mandarin, but their smile melted the grudges I almost started to hold against some Hong Kong people represented by that rude porter. 
This story reminded me of the dangers of generalization. Unless every single Hong Kong resident is surveyed objectively on their attitude towards mainlanders, it’s extremely difficult and misleading to paint Hong Kong with a broad stroke. 
While some mainlanders complain about discrimination by Hong Kong people, it’s important not to prejudge and generalize, otherwise, one could make the same mistake that he or she accuses the others of making and a small thing is blown out of proportion.
Hong Kong is much more sophisticated and complex than what one sees on the surface or in the news.  As a journalist and host, I always try to see the city and its people in greater depth and scope.  Only then, can we present to our audience a constructive discussion about what the real situation is like. 
CGTN Photo‍

CGTN Photo‍

I will not forget the sparkle in the eyes of the two Hong Kongers when they assured me that Hong Kong is friendlier than I thought.  And I will continue to discover this city with a different mind set from now on.

About Liu Xin and her program

Liu Xin joined CCTV in 1997 and was a member of the founding team of CCTV News in 2001. In 2011, she was posted to Geneva, Switzerland, to found CCTV’s Geneva Bureau and served as bureau chief for nearly six years. Since January 2017, she re-joined the English language service to host the brand new weekday program “The Point with Liu Xin”.
CGTN Photo

CGTN Photo

During the 30-minute program, she conducts live interviews with guests in the studio or via satellite link on two to three topics affecting people around the world from a Chinese perspective.
CGTN Photo

CGTN Photo

Coinciding with the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's handover, Liu is bringing a new vision to her platform by focusing on the steady development of Hong Kong in politics, economics, society and livelihood over the past 20 years. 
Liu is also taking part in a week-long special series of programs in Hong Kong with CGTN's Zou Yue and Cheng Lei, inviting guests from all walks of life for an in-depth look at both the opportunities and challenges faced by Hong Kong, as it serves as a bridge connecting the Chinese mainland with the world.

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