May: Brexit compromise with Labour not easy
Updated 22:40, 11-Apr-2019
CGTN

Reaching a Brexit compromise with the opposition Labour Party will not be easy, but both sides need to work together to deliver Brexit, British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Thursday.

Addressing a crowded chamber in the Houses of Parliament, the prime minister also faced tough questioning from lawmakers about the latest Brexit developments, including a call to resign after she returned from Brussels with a new Brexit extension.

The European Union has agreed to delay Brexit by six months while May seeks to reach an agreement with Labour to get her exit deal approved by parliament.

A pro-Brexit demonstrator protests outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, March 29, 2019. /Xinhua Photo 

A pro-Brexit demonstrator protests outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, March 29, 2019. /Xinhua Photo 

"This is not the normal way of British politics ... Reaching an agreement will not be easy, because to be successful it will require both sides to make compromises," May told parliament.

"But however challenging it may be politically, I profoundly believe that in this unique situation where the House is deadlocked, it is incumbent on both front benches to seek to work together to deliver what the British people voted for."

May said she was still pursuing an orderly departure from the EU, insisting there was still time for MPs to agree on a deal to avoid Britain taking part in the EU elections.

British Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (Front) attends the Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Commons in London, Britain, April 10, 2019. /Xinhua Photo

British Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn (Front) attends the Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Commons in London, Britain, April 10, 2019. /Xinhua Photo

She told MPs the whole Brexit debate was causing uncertainty across the country and needed to be resolved.

Meanwhile, the British government has indicated it may be willing to compromise in key areas which have prevented its Brexit deal being supported by the opposition Labour Party, its leader Jeremy Corbyn said on Thursday.

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"The talks now taking place between the opposition and the government are serious, detailed and ongoing, and I welcome the constructive engagement so far," Corbyn told parliament.

"I also welcome the indications from the government that they may be willing to move in the key areas that have prevented the Prime Minister's deal from being supported on this side of the House."

(Cover: British Prime Minister Theresa May (C) attends the Prime Minister's Questions at the House of Commons in London, Britain, April 10, 2019. /Xinhua Photo)

Source(s): Reuters ,Xinhua News Agency