Children's Day: Special classes helping youngsters better understand nature
Sun Tianyuan
["china"]
02:09
June 1 is International Children's Day, and one of Beijing's largest botanical gardens is treating youngsters who love plants a Green Day Out.
Beijing World Flower Wonderland Park began classes on plants and green living for children about a month ago. The park is located in Cao Qiao, Feng Tai district – a neighborhood that used to provide flowers and trees for the imperial family back in Qing Dynasty. 
"Cao Qiao has a long tradition in gardening. Our people are also known for their love of gardening. We love growing flowers, and it grows in our nature. Through these events, we hope the idea and ritual can pass down through the generations," said Shi Wenfang, curator of the park.
An orchid in full bloom. There are over 1,000 kinds of plants at Beijing World Flower Wonderland Park. /CGTN Photo

An orchid in full bloom. There are over 1,000 kinds of plants at Beijing World Flower Wonderland Park. /CGTN Photo

Shi said the classes are running alongside this year's International Horticultural Expo which is also being staged in the Chinese capital. Starting with the small things, the park pushes its green effort to encourage children to embrace nature from a young age.
So what are they learning about green living? 
Five-year-old Yue Yue, whose favorite flowers are roses and carnations, loves learning new knowledge about plants. 
"Green living is," she thought for a second, "getting surrounded by a lot of green things."
"It's sort of like the lawn, maybe tree leaves, or grass." Her peer, four-year-old Gao Qiaoxin guessed.
A parent-kid pair try their hands on art. /CGTN Photo

A parent-kid pair try their hands on art. /CGTN Photo

While their idea of green living seems to focus on one color, other classes offered by the park involve other powerful shades, for instance, tie-dye – a traditional cloth-dying technique using natural plant pigments.
"It's an integration of botany and traditional cultures. Pupils can participate and learn about them through art," said the curator.
Many parents spoke highly of their day out, saying it may have given their children ideas for the future.
A boy and his tie-dye art work. /CGTN Photo

A boy and his tie-dye art work. /CGTN Photo

"Green and eco-friendly is what people pursue now. I want my child to experience it and learn some skills. Maybe this could inspire him when he grows up." 
Well, let's not worry too much about getting old just yet. For now, just have a happy Green Children's Day.