‘Avengers: Endgame’ hits record high presales as market slows down
By Deng Junfang

The Chinese film market witnesses a box office earning of 410 million yuan (61 million U.S. dollars) in the 15th week of 2019, a drop by 24.5 percent from the previous week.

However, the pre-sales of “Avengers: Endgame” were not included in the gross box office calculations.

By the end of Sunday, the Marvel Comics superhero franchise had earned a pre-sale revenue of over 506 million yuan (75.4 million U.S. dollars) – 10 days after the pre-sale started. 

A poster for “Avengers: Endgame.” /Photo via Douban.com

A poster for “Avengers: Endgame.” /Photo via Douban.com

“Avengers: Endgame” has set a pre-sales record in China, hitting over 500 million yuan (74.5 million U.S. dollars). It will be released in the Chinese mainland on Wednesday, two days earlier than in North America.

Many movies have, therefore, changed air dates to avoid competition with the colossus, leaving a relatively quiet market last week.

The top three were all “old faces.” Hong Kong anti-corruption movie “P Storm” held the champion title for the 18th consecutive day since its release. It gained 21.2 million U.S. dollars last week, bringing its total box office to over 104 million U.S. dollars. Indian film “The Blind Melody” landed second while Japanese thriller “The Crimes That Bind” came as the third. 

A poster for “P Storm.” /Photo via Douban.com

A poster for “P Storm.” /Photo via Douban.com

Among the newly-released films, Paramount-animated feature “Wonder Park” worked the best with a box office of 3.26 million U.S. dollars, ranking fourth. It tells the story of a young girl’s adventures in an amusement park which she thought only existed in her imagination but comes to life. 

A poster for “Wonder Park.” /Photo via Douban.com

A poster for “Wonder Park.” /Photo via Douban.com

Many say it’s a good parent-child film as children are entranced by the colorful amusement park while parents learn how to encourage kids to be creative and imaginative.

Romance story “Lost in Love,” ranking No.6,  seized 2.92 million U.S. dollars. Considered as the Chinese version of the Japanese film “Hirugao,” the story is mainly about love and betrayal of two couples. 

A poster for “Lost in Love.” /Photo via Douban.com

A poster for “Lost in Love.” /Photo via Douban.com

It has generated polarized responses on different Chinese movie websites, with 7.7 out of 10 on the Maoyan platform but a gloomy 4.7 on Douban.com. 

The puppy-centered film “Push and Shove” managed to hit 1.79 million U.S. dollars one day after its release. 

A poster for "Push and Shove.” /Photo via Douban.com

A poster for "Push and Shove.” /Photo via Douban.com

The movie starts with a Schnauzer being badly injured by a Tibetan Mastiff. Director Wu Nan told CGTN that she hopes to stimulate thought on how people should think and behave when treated unfairly.