UK likely to be forced into Brexit delay if PM May's deal rejected
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Britain is likely to be forced into delaying its March 29 exit from the European Union if parliament rejects Prime Minister Theresa May's deal later this month, Junior Justice Minister Rory Stewart told Sky News on Sunday.
May has promised to bring a revised deal back to parliament by March 12, and if lawmakers reject it they will be given an opportunity to vote to leave without a deal or to extend the Article 50 negotiating period.
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"I think we would have to be forced into an extension of Article 50," Stewart said when asked which option he would choose if May's deal is rejected. "There doesn't seem to be parliamentary majority for 'no deal'."

Irish: 'Brexit delay is very likely'

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar echoed the comments by telling his Cabinet colleagues that a delay of Britain's exit date from the EU from March 29 to June is "very likely," Ireland's Sunday Independent quoted an unnamed minister as saying.
An anti-Brexit activist from the pressure group Our Future, Our Choice (OFOC) signs the campaign bus before a photocall in central London, February 27, 2019. /VCG Photo

An anti-Brexit activist from the pressure group Our Future, Our Choice (OFOC) signs the campaign bus before a photocall in central London, February 27, 2019. /VCG Photo

"The Taoiseach (prime minister) has privately said to us that it is very likely there will be an extension until June," the minister was quoted as saying.
An Irish government spokesman declined to comment on the veracity of the report but said the Cabinet's focus was "solely on securing a deal" and pointed to a comment by Varadkar Friday in which he said a British exit on March 29 without either a deal or an extension was unlikely.

A divided Labour Party

The UK's opposition Labour party, on the other hand, still hasn't reached a consensus regarding Brexit as Labour lawmaker Caroline Flint said Sunday that as many as 70 of the Labour lawmakers oppose holding a second Brexit referendum, contradictory to its earlier appeal which claimed to back a second referendum in order to avoid either a “no deal” or May's deal.
A group photo of the Independent Group, made up of eight former Labour MPs and three former Conservative MPs who split from their respective parties, February 25, 2019. /VCG Photo

A group photo of the Independent Group, made up of eight former Labour MPs and three former Conservative MPs who split from their respective parties, February 25, 2019. /VCG Photo

"I think there are something like 60-70 Labour members of Parliament who feel as strongly as I do against a second referendum," said Flint, who represents an area of Britain which voted to leave the EU at the 2016 referendum.
(Cover: Pro-Brexit activists march outside the Houses of Parliament in central London, February 27, 2019. /VCG Photo)
Source(s): Reuters